Echo & The Bunnymen – Meteorites

If ‘punk rock’ was the year zero cataclysmic event akin to the Big Bang, then the era known as post punk was the coalescing of all the debris produced,...
Echo & The Bunnymen : Meteorites
4.6 429
2014 

Echo & The Bunnymen : Meteorites

More

Click here for photos of Echo & The Bunnymen at Town Hall in New York, NY on November 21st, 2018 in the QRO Concert Photo Gallery

Click here for photos of Echo & The Bunnymen at Ford Amphitheatre on Coney Island in Brooklyn, NY on July 12th, 2017 in the QRO Concert Photo Gallery

Click here for photos of Echo & The Bunnymen at 2016 Bingley Music Live in Bradford, U.K. in the QRO Concert Photo Gallery

Click here for photos of Echo & The Bunnymen at Rock City in Nottingham, U.K. on October 17th, 2015 in the QRO Concert Photo Gallery

Click here for photos of Echo & The Bunnymen at 2015 Riot Fest in Chicago, IL in the QRO Concert Photo Gallery

Click here for photos of Echo & The Bunnymen at Rock City on December 2nd, 2014 in the QRO Concert Photo Gallery

Click here for photos of Echo & The Bunnymen at Paradise in Boston, MA on August 14th, 2014 in the QRO Concert Photo Gallery

Click here for QRO’s review of Echo & The Bunnymen at Colston Hall in Bristol, U.K. on April 17th, 2013

Click here for QRO’s review of Echo & The Bunnymen playing Symphony Hall in Birmingham, U.K. on September 25th, 2011

Click here for photos of Echo & The Bunnymen at 2011 Latitude Festival in Southwold, U.K. in the QRO Concert Photo Gallery

Click here for photos of Echo & The Bunnymen at 2011 Primavera Sound Music Festival in Barcelona, Spain in the QRO Concert Photo Gallery

Click here for photos of Echo & The Bunnymen at Irving Plaza in New York, NY on May 14th, 2011 in the QRO Concert Photo Gallery

Click here for QRO’s review of Echo & The Bunnymen playing Crocodiles and Heaven Up Here at Paradise on May 9th, 2011

Click here for QRO’s review of Echo & The Bunnymen, playing Crocodiles and Heaven Up Here, at Brixton Academy in London, U.K. on December 9th, 2010

If ‘punk rock’ was the year zero cataclysmic event akin to the Big Bang, then the era known as post punk was the coalescing of all the debris produced, giving rise to a new form, a new beginning, brimming with fresh ideas. Let’s face it: punk in the United Kingdom meant Never Mind the Bollocks and little all else. The Clash’s first album had its moments but they were already ‘the new Stones’ in waiting. Apart from a few interesting singles from the likes of Wire, Ruts and Subway Sect, we were left with parodies of The Stooges and speeded up heavy metal riffs with dodgy political ideologies draped over the top. Post-punk, however, was the gargantuan step forward that the punk movement had initiated and instead of the aforementioned Stooges, the new movement was looking to Lou Reed and The Velvet Underground, as well as The Doors for guidance, and even further afield with the likes of Can and Neu were added to the melting pot. In this exiting climate of rapidly evolving sounds and ideas Echo & The Bunnymen came to the fore with their initial release “Rescue” making ‘Single of the Week’ in most of the U.K. music weeklies, and the subsequent album Crocodiles scoring the perfect ten with most critics. In the three decades that have passed since these initial releases, we have had further classic albums but none coming close to the first four, and Meteorites is no exception. After the death of Pete de Freitas in a motorcycle accident and the departure of bassist Les Pattinson, The Bunnymen have been for most of the last two decades the duo of Mc Culloch and Sergeant with session musicians enlisted for touring and recording duties.

The album opens with the title track, an atmospheric ballad with a mournful Mc Culloch asking, “Where is the hope?”, but unfortunately this doesn’t set the precedent for subsequent tracks and a downturn in quality soon follows. Most of the album consists of over-produced and over-orchestrated arrangements of songs that have little direction or spark of energy. “Constantinople” is a decent stab at an alignment with the new psych bands in its eastern guitar tunings, but Sergeant’s talent and intricacies are mostly buried in the sludge of strings and layered vocals. “Market Town” is possibly the only other track where the guitar stands proud and its seven and a half minutes is a welcome break from the barrage of attempts at pop classicism that most fall woefully short.

Most bands from the golden era described have either given up or are doing the round of ‘classic album’ tours, a money generating exercise that The Bunnymen themselves have also been ‘guilty’ of (QRO live review). They should be commended for being both brave and confident enough to release new material to a dwindling audience three decades after their nadir, but with this album the fan base will hark back to a time when the guitars chimed and ‘Mac the Mouth’ was in his pomp.

Categories
Album Reviews