New Buffalo : Somewhere, anywhere.

<a href="Reviews/Album_Reviews/New_Buffalo_%3A_Somewhere%2C_anywhere./"><img src="http://www.qromag.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/03/newbuffalosomewhereanywhere.jpg" alt=" " /></a> The lonely narrative of New Buffalo's second full-length is a poetic, piano-driven collection that exudes a fireside coziness.  The lady who goes by...
6.9 Dot Dash
2007 

 The lonely narrative of New Buffalo’s second full-length is a poetic, piano-driven collection that exudes a fireside coziness.  The lady who goes by New Buffalo, Sally Seltmann orchestrates an indoor album of sober, heartfelt ballads on Somewhere, anywhere.   The Australian songstress features the remniscient poignancy of a photo album in the sway of moods exhibited through her flaxen vocals and nimble keywork.  Somewhere, anywhere. is charming and delicate as a simple journey through the mind of a woman at her piano.

There’s an angelic innocence in Seltmann’s vocals that allows the piano and occasional guitar and violin on Somewhere, anywhere. to combine and create an unassuming, quilty comfort.  The head-bobbing "City and Sea (Lady Nameless)" includes some wispy electronics that give it a fireflies-in-the-backyard feel.  "You’ve Gone My Friend" is a lulling acoustic track with multi-tracked, cooing vocals.  The softness on Somewhere, anywhere. is several layers thick.

Even at its peaks, the music remains gentle.  On "It’s True", the piano surges from dotting to dancing, while Seltmann’s vocals reach up in a begging strain.  "Emotional Champ" rolls through a piano meadow, then expands with horns in a dramatic, but subdued crescendo.  

Somewhere, anywhere. has a subtle, inviting feel that Sally Seltmann pulls in several directions without stretching too thin.  Her piano unfurls a smooth carpet for her vocals to dance upon with light feet and waving arms.  It’s as genuinely comforting as an album can get.

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